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Pencil portrait of Alyzza by LateStarter63 Pencil portrait of Alyzza by LateStarter63
Graphite pencil portrait of Alyzza on A4 Daler Rowney Airbrush Bristol board.

Pencils: Various Mars Lumograph (6H to 8B), Faber Castell 9000 (6B to 8B), mechanical pencils 0.3mm/2B, 0.5mm/4B.
Blending: Blending stump from Royal Langnickel, cotton buds and paper tissues.
Erasing: WH Smith kneadable eraser, Jakar battery eraser, Tombow Mono Zero Ultra-fine eraser. 

My sincere thanks go to Peter Dahlgren on Flickr for making his lovely photo of Alyzza, from which I made this drawing, available for derivative works via a CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 licence

When I saw this photo on Flickr several months ago I saw those eyes and thought that I must draw them sometime!

Here are some of my other drawings  Pencil portrait of Sweet Hot Pie by LateStarter63  Pencil portrait of Avery by LateStarter63  Pencil portrait of Anastasiya by LateStarter63  Pencil portrait of a young girl by LateStarter63  Pencil portrait of Sarah by LateStarter63
 
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:iconanushhk-13:
anushhk-13 Featured By Owner Mar 31, 2017  Hobbyist Interface Designer
All the art is beautiful and inspirational :-). Thank you for sharing.
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Edited Mar 31, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you very much, Anusha, and thank you also for adding this drawing to your favourites and for the 'Watch'.
Reply
:iconanushhk-13:
anushhk-13 Featured By Owner Apr 3, 2017  Hobbyist Interface Designer
very welcome :-) happy to watch your art. Inspired.....
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:iconphailpoet:
Phailpoet Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2017  New Deviant Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I hope one day I can achieve this level of detail. This is just stunning, I started teaching myself to draw last week, and this is an inspiration like nothing I've ever seen. Thanks for sharing these with us.
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I am sure that you can.  I am no innate artist.  When I started drawing my pictures were laughable.  Luckily I did not have the Internet so had only my own drawings to judge my improvement.  Had I seen  when I first started, as I did almost 3 years later by which time I had improved considerably, what others could achieve with a pencil it would probably have put me off drawing.  This would have been a great pity as I have gained a great deal of pleasure from my hobby.  If you are interested my First Year Journal tells of my artistic journey from its laughable beginnings to the time that I joined DeviantArt.  My Scraps illustrates this journal.
I feel convinced that anyone could make drawings like the ones that I do.  It just takes practice, patience and an eye for detail.  Oh, and more practice!
Good luck,
Clive
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:iconmirrors--edge:
Mirrors--Edge Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2016
Fantastic,  very accurate,   you don't need a photo camera!!
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you very much and thank you also for adding this to your favourites.  Unfortunately someone else has to produce the photo from which I make my drawing. I have no imagination, or ability, to draw from scratch.
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:iconmirrors--edge:
Mirrors--Edge Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2016
You 're very good at what you do!!
Keep it up
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:iconlisador22:
lisador22 Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Really no words to describe this fantastic drawing *_*
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you very much, Lisador.  It is one of my own favourites and hangs in my hallway.
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:iconeldereagle:
ElderEagle Featured By Owner Jul 18, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
 That is really amazing. You did a fantastic job. Congratulations!
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Jul 18, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you very much, Marcelo, and thanks too for adding this to your favourites and also for the 'Watch'.
Reply
:iconeldereagle:
ElderEagle Featured By Owner Jul 18, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
It's really well made and positive too.
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:iconeldereagle:
ElderEagle Featured By Owner Jul 18, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
You're very welcome
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:iconebbenhorst:
Ebbenhorst Featured By Owner Jul 1, 2016
Beautiful
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Jul 1, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you very much, Johan, and thanks too for adding this to your favourites.
Reply
:iconak69666:
ak69666 Featured By Owner Jun 24, 2016
omg !ur words r really useful sir!!i too wondered about this camera related question!!aspiring to be like u someday! 
Reply
:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Jun 26, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
It is not only, or sometimes even predominantly, the camera that can affect the quality of the picture that you upload.  Certainly a 2 Megapixel camera should give a noticeably poorer picture quality than an 8 Megapixel one (all other things being equal), but neither camera will give a good picture if the drawing that you are photographing is unevenly illuminated.  This I have noticed to be a problem on some of your pictures.
Another thing that can improve the photograph and make its appearance on the computer more closely resemble that of the drawing in life is adjustment of the histogram of the photo.  I intend to cover this in the next of my tutorials.
Reply
:icondarnelldorsey:
DarnellDorsey Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Hi, I love your artwork.... I was just wondering, does a camera make much of a difference in reference to how a picture looks on a computer?
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yes, it certainly can.  My inexpensive compact camera has 12 Mpixels for a 3x4 photo.  I see that the Yifang and Samsung tablets that you have used are 1.9 and 3 Mpixels respectively.  I have used a 2 Mpixel tablet camera for some WIP photos but would always use the higher resolution camera for uploads to my gallery.  Apart from the lower resolution there is more chance of camera shake (no image stabilisation and the need to tap the screen to take the photo!).

Using my Lumix camera does not guarantee a perfect picture, however.
Even illumination is essential.  I photograph in a room with large windows at either end and take care that no light can reflect directly back into the camera from graphite shine by holding a dark cloth (a navy blue cardigan!) behind the camera to block light from behind the camera.  I use a tripod for the camera and an easel for the drawing to make things easier.  I adjust the blinds and curtains on the windows to get even illumination, checking with a sheet of black paper in place of my drawing, viewed through the camera.

I found that if I use zoom so that the camera can be further from the drawing to reduce distortions, the image is not so sharp.  So I use it without zoom and correct, using GIMP, for the barrel distortion that is introduced.

In spite of aligning the camera carefully there is always some amount of perspective distortion so I trim around the photo of my drawing to the correct aspect ratio of the paper then pull the photographed image back to this correct aspect ratio using the perspective tool in GIMP, trim off the edges of the drawing and adjust the histogram so that the tonal range matches that of my drawing.  Adjusting the histogram allows me to correct for the grey cast that otherwise usually affects the photos.

I prepared a tutorial, but I was using a free program with far fewer facilities than GIMP (which is also free) at the time.  I have not got round to updating it but I have put some updated notes in the description.  Here is the link: Prepare a photo of a b/w drawing before submission.
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:icondarnelldorsey:
DarnellDorsey Featured By Owner May 3, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you, that explanation was Awesome!!!!!! I will most certainly try those methods, and hopefully my pictures with come out much better. Also, thank you for the link!!!!! :-)
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:iconnephele99:
Nephele99 Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2016
completely adorable! you did a great job! :clap:
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you very much, Gabriela.
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:iconmamamika:
MamaMika Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2016  Hobbyist Photographer
!! So so beautiful...!!!!!!!!!! 
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you very much, Maria, and thanks too for adding this to your favourites.
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:iconrahula87:
Rahula87 Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Wonderful! It looks like a photo plus your Works cheer me up!
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you very much, Valentina.  It is nice to hear of their effect on you.  Thank you, too, for adding this and three more of my portraits to your favourites.
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:iconrahula87:
Rahula87 Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
You are welcome,i will always check your Gallery!
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:iconraypelesko:
RayPelesko Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Excellent! The details and precision in her hair is wonderful! Great expression too.
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you very much, Ray.  Of course the photographer, her father, caught the expression that I transcribed.
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:iconloonalucy:
LoonaLucy Featured By Owner Dec 21, 2015
Great! Fantastic!Clap 
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Dec 21, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you very much.
Reply
:iconseiko:
seiko Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2015  Hobbyist
At a glance it looks like a photo! You've done a spectacular job. And your photo model is very adorable. What a cute face! I find the hair and eyes the most amazing. Those kinds of details aren't always easy to do, but you've made her really come to life.
Reply
:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you very much, Sa.  The hair of her fringe was surprising easy as it was relatively straight, or curved in one direction only.  I was pleased with the glow in her eyes, achieved by drawing in the iris rays, blending, adding more rays, blending again and then adding the 'glow' by carefully lifting off some graphite with a kneadable eraser.
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:iconseiko:
seiko Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2015  Hobbyist
You're quite welcome. Either you are incredibly humble about the work that you do, or a man with skills of your caliber truly finds it easy. Either way, your work is quite impressive and I look forward to seeing more in the future.
I really appreciate you sharing your technique for the eyes. ^^ I never did get the hang of a kneaded eraser (I have one around here somewhere..), but it's always interesting to see the techniques different artists use to get their results.
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
What I meant by 'surprisingly easy' was that before I started the drawing, as is often the case, I was not exactly sure how I was going to tackle parts of it (in this case the hair) and it turned out to be not as difficult as I had feared.  Most of my drawings are to some extent a journey into the unknown.  I would have laid down the positions of the important crosses and overlaps of the hair and then drawn in the locks of hair around them.  Again I would have used the kneadable eraser, this time to add highlights to the hair.

I find the kneadable eraser absolutely indispensable.  Pinched into an edge it can be used to add highlights to hair.  Pinched into a point it can be used to add texture to skin, and if you add light shading around the lightened spot on the side away from the light source, it will depict a raised spot.  Again, when pinched to a point, it will clean up the highlight on the tip or bridge of the nose, which might otherwise look rather flat from blending around the nose.  It can also be used to reduce the shading if I have gone in too dark!

It is my firm belief that anyone could reach a similar standard that I have reached with practice, patience and an eye for detail.  I am no innate artist as my First Year Journal relates.
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:iconseiko:
seiko Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2015  Hobbyist
That's true, it does takes time and dedication to reach that level. I agree with you wholeheartedly that many others can reach that level if they apply themselves. It just takes longer for some than others. I know I've struggled at some times to reach a level that was far more attainable for other people around me. That happens, too.

Some tools and mediums are easier to come to different people, but no method should be taken lightly. I'm really grateful for you sharing some of your techniques with me. Thank you for that.

I certainly admire your passion. I've looked over your provided link to your journal and I have to say that no matter what you consider yourself, you really art a true artist. An artist isn't always someone who brings to life something in their imagination, but someone who breathes life into a craft. Poets, writers, musicians, digital and traditional medium painters, sculptors and drafters. Glassblowers are as much artists as architects or someone with a sketch pad and a bowl of fruit or a model before them. You're welcome to feel however you feel, define yourself how you feel comfortable, but by any other name, sir, you are still an artist. ^^

Artist, to me, means the same thing as 'creator'. You create traditional works and your work has much life in it. You do have a great eye for detail and you've honed your skill-set and use your tools with as much passion and pride as any artist can dream for. The fact that you improved so much with only self-study is, to me, a tribute to the greats who also came the same way before you. At least in our cases we don't have to pay or rob for a body to sketch. There's a perk to being born in the era we're in for artists.

Ahh, sorry. ^^; I tend to get on little tangents. In a nutshell, you're a wonderful fine artist and I'm very glad I stumbled across your work here. Your work will help other artists to aspire to greater heights and inspire them to try harder to improve--seeing as you did all of this on your own. It's really quite wonderful.
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I very much appreciate the time that you have spent writing this.  I enjoy what I do and am very gratified that others can gain pleasure from them too.  I thank you for adding me to your watchlist and hope that I do not disappoint in future.
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:iconseiko:
seiko Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2015  Hobbyist
It's my pleasure. I look forward to your future works.
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:iconstarspirit5:
StarSpirit5 Featured By Owner Oct 29, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
LOVE THE HAIR omg!! It look sooo real!!!
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you very much.  It was actually much easier to draw than it looks.
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:icontcador:
tcador Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Love it!
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Oct 29, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you very much and welcome to DeviantArt.
Reply
:iconmooper246:
Mooper246 Featured By Owner Sep 28, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
It took me a few seconds to realize that this is a drawing! Wow this is awesome!
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you very much, Arend, and thanks too for adding this to your favourites.
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:iconddc73:
Ddc73 Featured By Owner Sep 26, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I envy the hair skills
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Sep 26, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
It is just something that I learned by trial and error (I am not one to follow tutorials!).  I do not try too hard to replicate the reference exactly, but go with my own flow.  I mark the positions of major breaks and overlaps in the hair and then draw in the hair using these positions as a general guide for direction.  I blend, lift out highlights with a kneadable eraser, then add more layers of graphite, blending and erasing until I am satisfied.  Fine highlights are added with the Tombow eraser.
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:iconsantakass:
Santakass Featured By Owner Aug 16, 2015
Perfect
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Aug 16, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you very much, Krzysztof.
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:iconpetrmarvin:
petrmarvin Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
hello sir, can I ask you something ?how can you draw the lights ? I mean the white color on her hair.. do you use white pencil ?or anything else.. thank you and much appreciated if you have time to answer me.. hahaha
I love your drawing sir :)
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Details

Submitted on
October 27, 2014
Image Size
3.3 MB
Resolution
3537×2431
Submitted with
Sta.sh
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Stats

Views
10,181 (1 today)
Favourites
460 (who?)
Comments
270
Downloads
182

Camera Data

Make
Panasonic
Model
DMC-FS10
Shutter Speed
10/300 second
Aperture
F/2.8
Focal Length
5 mm
ISO Speed
160
Date Taken
Oct 27, 2014, 11:18:34 AM
Software
GIMP 2.8.14

License

Creative Commons License
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Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
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